Prepositions

A preposition relates the noun/pronoun that appears with it to another word in the sentence—expresses a relationship between words/ideas and acts as a connector.

Relationship that a preposition shows may involve LOCATION, DIRECTION, TIME, CAUSE, POSSESSION

Ex. I went (around the world) this summer.

It seems like some classes last (for hours).

They were grounded (because of their bad behavior).

*Prepositional phrase is a group of words that includes a preposition and a noun/pronoun.  Prepositional phrases are in (  ) in the above examples.

***The noun/pronoun with the preposition is called the object of the preposition.

Ex. During his childhood (obj of prep), Joe lived in Oklahoma (obj of prep).

 Prepositions

aboard                                   before                                    in front of                             over

about                                      behind                                   in place of                         owing to

above                                     below                                     inside                                    past

according to                         beneath                                   in regard to                          prior to

across from                          beside                                    in spite of                             regarding

across                                    besides                                   instead of                             round

after                                        between                                into                                        since

againstl                                  beyond                                  in view of                             through

ahead of                                 but                                          like                                        throughout

along                                      by                                           near                                       till

alongside                              by means of                          nearby                                   to

along with                             concerning                            next to                                 together with

amid                                       considering                          off                                          toward

among                                    despite                                   of                                           under

apart from                             down                                      on                                          underneath

around                                   during                                    on account of                      until

aside from                            except                                    onto                                       unto

as of                                       for                                           on top of                               up

at                                             from                                       opposite                               upon

atop                                        in                                            out                                         with

barring                                   in addition to                       out of                                    without

because of                             in back of                              outside                                 within

A word can’t be a preposition unless it’s in a prepositional phrase!!!!!!!!

If the word you think is a preposition ends a sentence (no prep phrase), it’s probably an adverb!!!!!!

Ex. The house is down the street. (down is preposition…street is object of prep)

Derek fought to keep the animal down. (no prep. phrase, so down is adverb

Click on the link below for practice!

prepositionpractice

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